San Francisco’s Policy of “Let the Thieves Go” leads to a surge in burglaries!

‘Prolific’ offenders help drive 46% surge in SF burglaries

San Francisco police are having trouble keeping up with a roughly 46 percent surge in home and commercial burglaries this year that authorities suspect is being driven in part by chronic offenders.

Officers have cleared less than 12 percent of burglary cases this year as of Sunday compared to about 16 percent at this time last year, with reports of burglaries swelling from 4,715 to 6,895 during the same time frame, according to data released by the San Francisco Police Department.

So an uptick in crime … dive into the article and we find …

The department has compiled a list of 30 such offenders, Scott said. Some are believed to be responsible for as many as 30 known burglaries, and may also be connected to larger enterprises and even international fencing operations.

“We have identified some individuals who are prolific and we have to deal with that,” Scott said. “We have just got to figure out a solution.”  — Source: S.F. Examiner

They can’t figure out a solution for the crime surge … it’s really simply … ARREST them, CHARGE them, TRY them in a court of law! Duh! It’s not rocket science …

We're are being CENSORED ... HELP get the WORD OUT! SHARE!!!
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